DVVI Xchange Program: Sites of Memory

The DVVI Xchange Program: Sites of Memory is an exchange and information sharing program run through the collaborative efforts of DVV International and the Hrant Dink Foundation as part of the “Hrant Dink Memorial Site” project. It seeks to take 20 individuals – researchers, students, activists and young professionals of different disciplines and professions – working on memory and memorial sites and provide them with the opportunity to gain new experiences on this topic. It does so by sending each participant to a site of memory/conscience located in a foreign country for a period of 4-8 weeks.

The program will send a total of 20 participants chosen from among applicants to foreign countries in three different phases: in the first phase, eight selected participants will be sent between August 2017-December 2017; in the second phase, ten selected participants will be sent between January 2018 – December 2018; and in the third phase, two chosen participants will be sent between January 2019 – March 2019 to the destinations of their choosing.

Applicants to this program should:

  • Be above the age of 18,
  • Speak the national language of his/her selected host country, or speak a foreign language widely spoken in that location.
  • Have worked, be currently working on, or wish to work on the topic of ‘memorial sites/memorialization’.

The program strongly upholds the principle of equal opportunity and thus seeks to ensure that our participants reflect the diversity of ethnicity, gender, cultural identity and beliefs that exists in Turkey.

For this reason, priority will be given to applications coming from outside of Istanbul, Ankara and Izmir; young participants with no prior experiences of travel to a foreign country; and female applicants.

Those interested in participating in this program can apply by sending their motivation letters, justified country preferences, at least one reference letter and their resume to this address. The motivation letter should be no longer than 2 pages and should be written in both Turkish and a second language fitting the host country (either the national language or a foreign language widely spoken at the host country – for example, English); the reference can be given by either a person or an institution.

The applicants can select a maximum of 3 host countries of interest and should provide an explanation of why they chose these particular institutions.

The program will cover all expenses of visas, travel insurance, domestic and international travel and accommodation, as well as provide a travel allowance to meet the basic needs of the participant while abroad.

We highly recommend that every applicant should read the program principles, which detail the program’s objectives and conditions of participation, before applying to the program.

Application Deadline: 12 September 2017, 17:00

Selection Committee: Sibel Asna, Bülent Bilmez, Ayşe Öktem

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Hrant Dink Vakfı
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Das Auswärtige Amt
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DVV International

Host Institutes

Location: Buenos Aires- Argentina

Period of Program: October-November 2017/ May-June 2018

Duration of weeks: 4-8 weeks

Quota: 1 volunteer

Webpagehttp://www.espaciomemoria.ar/

 

The recovery of the property formerly occupied by the Naval School of Mechanics (ESMA, as abbreviated in Spanish) is part of the historical battle carried out by human rights organizations in Argentina, starting with the resistance against dictatorship and remaining strong until today. These tenacious actions in pursuit of Remembrance, Truth and Justice were assumed by our country as State policies since 2003.

 

The longing of human rights organizations and survivors to recuperate the ESMA property (symbolic extermination centre during the dictatorship years and place of military resistance and public controversies surrounding the collective memory since the restoration of democracy, in 1983) was accomplished within this context.

 

In 2004, the Federal Government and the Government of the City of Buenos Aires, with an active involvement of human rights organizations, created the “Remembrance and Human Rights Centre”. Both jurisdictions – the State’s and the City’s- signed an agreement establishing the campus’ restitution to the City1 and the Navy’s eviction. At the same time, a bipartisan commission was created to oversee this process.

 

The Centre is a public site that works to promote remembrance about the tragedy this society suffered, contributing to the collective comprehension of our past and committed to our society’s present problems and needs. It was also conceived as a place to pay tribute to the victims of the civic-military dictatorship.

 

Multiple political and social institutions and organizations coexist here, working to preserve remembrance and to defend and promote human rights through different perspectives, strategies and methods.

Location: Warsaw- Poland

Period of Program: November-December 2017/ September-December 2018

Duration of weeks: 4-8 weeks

Quota: 2 volunteers

Webpage: http://www.polin.pl

 

POLIN Museum is the first public-private partnership in Poland, created jointly by the government, the local government, and a non-governmental organization. Under a tripartite agreement signed on January 25, 2005, by the Minister of Culture and National Heritage, the Mayor of Warsaw, and the Chairman of the Association of the JHI, the public party financed, i.a., the construction of the building and its equipment. The Association of the JHI was responsible for financing and organizing the process of producing the core exhibition. POLIN Museum is a modern cultural institution – a narrative museum which presents a 1000-year history of Polish Jews. It is also a place for meetings and conversations for all of those eager to learn more about the past and present Jewish culture, to confront the stereotypes, and to face the perils of today’s world such as xenophobia and nationalistic prejudices. By promoting openness, tolerance, and truth, POLIN Museum contributes to the mutual understanding and respect amongst Poles and Jews.

Location: Belfast- Northern Ireleand

Period of Program: September-November 2017

Duration of weeks: 4-8 weeks

Quota: 1 Volunteer

Webpage: www.healingthroughremembering.org

 

Healing Through Remembering is an independent initiative made up of a diverse membership with different political perspectives working on a common goal of how to deal with the legacy of the past as it relates to the conflict in and about Northern Ireland.

Location: Johannesburg- South Africa

Period of Program: October-November-December 2017

Duration of weeks: 4-8 weeks

Quota: 1 Volunteer

Webpagehttps://www.constitutionhill.org.za/

 

Constitution Hill is a living museum that tells the story of South Africa’s journey to democracy. The site is a former prison and military fort that bears testament to South Africa’s turbulent past and, today, is home to the country’s Constitutional Court, which endorses the rights of all citizens.

There is perhaps no other site of incarceration in South Africa that imprisoned the sheer number of world-renowned men and women as those held within the walls of the Old Fort, the Women’s Jail and Number Four. Nelson Mandela. Mahatma Gandhi. Joe Slovo. Albertina Sisulu. Winnie Madikizela-Mandela. Fatima Meer. They all served time here. But the precinct also confined tens of thousands of ordinary people during its 100-year history: men and women of all races, creeds, ages and political agendas; the indigenous and the immigrant; the everyman and the elite. In this way, the history of every South African lives here.

Constitution Hill is also a place of contrasts: of injustice and justice, of oppression and liberation. Our precinct is testament to the importance of preserving sites of atrocity for posterity, and also to recreating them so that they can serve the purposes of the present and serve to mould the future.

We offer daily tours of the precinct and conduct regular public events, enabling visitors from every walk of life to interact with our space. There are also a variety of venues on our site available to suit your every eventing need, from small private functions to large corporate conferences.

We invite you to explore our space, to experience it, to feel it. Touch our textured walls, read their graffiti, listen to their echoes, stride up the Great African Steps, stand in the highest court in our land, and learn what constitutionalism means in South Africa.

Location: Washington- USA

Period of Program: October- November 2017

Duration of weeks: 4-8 weeks

Quota: 1 Volunteer

Webpage: http://www.nmai.si.edu/

 

A diverse and multifaceted cultural and educational enterprise, the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) is an active and visible component of the Smithsonian Institution, the world’s largest museum complex. The NMAI cares for one of the world’s most expansive collections of Native artifacts, including objectsphotographsarchives, and media covering the entire Western Hemisphere, from the Arctic Circle to Tierra del Fuego.

The National Museum of the American Indian operates three facilities. The museum on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., offers exhibition galleries and spaces for performances, lectures and symposia, research, and education. The George Gustav Heye Center (GGHC) in New York City houses exhibitions, research, educational activities, and performing arts programs. The Cultural Resources Center (CRC) in Suitland, Maryland, houses the museum’s collections as well as the conservation, repatriation, and digital imaging programs, and research facilities. The NMAI’s off-site outreach efforts, often referred to as the “fourth museum,” include websites, traveling exhibitions, and community programs.

Since the passage of its enabling legislation in 1989 (amended in 1996), the NMAI has been steadfastly committed to bringing Native voices to what the museum writes and presents, whether on-site at one of the three NMAI venues, through the museum’s publications, or via the Internet. The NMAI is also dedicated to acting as a resource for the hemisphere’s Native communities and to serving the greater public as an honest and thoughtful conduit to Native cultures—present and past—in all their richness, depth, and diversity.

Location: Sarajevo- Bosnia and Herzegovina

Period of Program: September-October-November 2017

Duration of weeks: 4-8 weeks

Quota: 1 Volunteer

Webpage: http://muzej.ba/

 

The History Museum of Bosnia and Herzegovina aims to collect, preserve, explore, present, and promote the cultural and historical heritage of Bosnia and Herzegovina. From its founding in 1945 until 1993, the Museum remained thematically focused on the history of antifascism during World War II and the cultivation of socialist state values. The name of the Museum, once Museum of the Revolution of Bosnia and Herzegovina, has changed several times, but it has always been recognizable. After being renamed the History Museum in 1993, the thematic structure of the Museum has also changed. Now the aim is to study the history of Bosnia and Herzegovina from the Middle Ages to present times.

The History Museum of Bosnia and Herzegovina is a unique cultural institution in Bosnia and Herzegovina which has become a space for dialogue about the past and different aspects of remembrance. The museum develops different programs and activities in order to help visitors talk about the past, present, and future through the museum collections.

Location: Sarajevo- Bosnia and Herzegovina

Period of Program: October-November-December 2017

Duration of weeks: 4-8 weeks

Quota: 1 Volunteer

Webpage: http://www.warchildhood.com/

 

Based on the crowd-sourced book War Childhood and founded on the principles of social entrepreneurship, the independent and youth-led War Childhood Museum has garnered recognition as the world’s only museum focused exclusively on the experience of childhood affected by war.

Offering an unique platform for communication and sharing, WCM tackles trauma on an individual level, ultimately contributing to better understanding among the whole of society. Its first permanent exhibition opened in January 2017, seven years after the project’s inception in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Having proven successful in providing Bosnians of all ages a rare opportunity to confront the traumas of their recent past without reinforcing ethnic boundaries, WCM managed to expand its activities abroad. Currently, WCM operates in LebanonUkraine, and the United States – becoming an international platform that gives voice to current and former war children.

Its quick growth garnered a lot of attention and facilitated collaboration between WCM and some of the world’s leading universities. WCM has had the privilege of presenting at the largest peace-building, youth, and museum conferences. Its efforts have received media coverage from New York City to Tokyo.

Location: Saraybosna, Bosna Hersek

Period of program: October, November, December 2017

Quota: 2 Volunteer

Duration of weeks: 4-8 weeks

Webpage: http://tunelspasa.ba/

 

The Sarajevo War Tunnel or the Tunnel of Hope exists today as a “Monumental complex tunnel D-B (Dobrinja-Butmir)” within the framework of the Memorial Fund, which is a unique administrative institution within Bosina and Herzegovina. Its uniqueness stems from the fact that along with other regular activities, it is tasked with nurturing a culture of memory regarding the events of the 1992-1995 War. The Tunnel of Hope is one of the most important cultural and historic buildings and destinations of concern managed by the Memorial Fund today. By all indicators it is the most visited cultural and historical destination in the Sarajevo Canton, attracting more than 100,000 visitors annually. This is due to the fact that the Tunnel played an enormously crucial role in the defense and supplying of the city of during its several-year siege and thus occupies an important place in the recent culture and history of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The task of the Memorial Fund, among other things, is to collect, process, and present archival and museum materials about the Object D-B, as well as to develop, promote and take care of the monumental area. Furthermore, it aims to educate people about the past human struggles and represent the human values symbolized within them. As a cultural and historical destination, the Monumental complex tunnel D-B is a place one surely must visit.

Location: Berlin-Germany

Period of Program: October-November 2017

Duration of weeks: 4-8 weeks

Quota: 1 volunteer

Webpage: https://www.jmberlin.de/en

 

Since opening its doors in 2001, the Jewish Museums Berlin has joined the ranks of Europe’s leading museums. Its exhibitions and permanent collection, educational activities, and diverse program of events make the museum a vibrant center of reflection on Jewish history and culture as well as about migration and diversity in Germany.

An architectural masterpiece, Daniel Libeskind’s spectacular structure has firmly established itself as one of Berlin’s most recognizable landmarks. The zinc-paneled building is innovative in the connection it creates between the museum’s topics and its architecture. Libeskind has dubbed his design Between the Lines, a title that reflects the tensions of German-Jewish history. Inscribed within the design of the building, the past takes shape along two lines charting various cultural connections and modes of thought: one is straight, but broken into many fragments; the other is winding and open-ended. The intersection of these lines is marked by voids – empty spaces that cut through the entire museum. Rich in symbolism, the museum’s architecture makes German-Jewish history palpable.

The museum’s permanent historical exhibition extends over 3,000 m² and invites visitors to travel through two millennia of German-Jewish history. Its depictions of 14 historical periods from the Middle Ages to the present paint a vivid portrait of Jewish life in Germany. Artistic and everyday objects, photos and letters, interactive displays and media stations together convey the history of Jewish culture and show how tightly Jewish life and German history are interwoven.

Temporary exhibitions on cultural history, contemporary art installations, and special displays – these are a few of the ways in which the museum’s special exhibitions draw on a broad range of themes to complement the permanent historical exhibition.

In November 2012, the Academy of the Jewish Museum Berlin opened ceremoniously across the street from the museum. The Academy, built after architect Daniel Libeskind’s design titled Zwischenräume (in-between spaces), is integrated into the hall of the former central flower market. The new location unites, with a total surface of 6.000 square meters, the archives, library and education department under one roof, as well as the newly founded Academy Programs. Since 2013, the Academy Programs broaden the museum’s spectrum to include the debate on new terms and concepts necessary for greater social participation of ethnic and religious minorities in German society today.

Location: Sarajevo- Bosnia and Herzegovina

Period of Program: September- October 2017

Duration of weeks: 4-8 weeks

Quota: 1 Volunteer

 

The Museum of Crimes Against Humanity and Genocide 1992-1995 opened its doors this week in central Sarajevo, with displays of personal items exhumed from mass graves such as shirts, combs and watches as well as material from the archives of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia.

“There is no such museum in Bosnia and Herzegovina, a museum that includes all the facts from the period 1992-1995 in one place,” said Alija Gluhovic, a member of the museum’s organising committee.

As well as panels of information about the history of the conflict, the museum features a reconstruction of a prison cell.

It also screens films about the war, including ‘City Under Siege’ and ‘The End of Impunity – Sexual Violence before the Tribunal’ and ‘Through Their Eyes’, about victims and witnesses of crimes who overcame their fears to testify in court.

Location: Cape Town- South Africa

Period of Program: September-October-November 2017

Duration of weeks: 4-8 weeks

Quota: 1 Volunteer

Webpage: http://www.districtsix.co.za/

 

District Six was named the Sixth Municipal District of Cape Town in 1867. Originally established as a mixed community of freed slaves, merchants, artisans, labourers and immigrants, District Six was a vibrant centre with close links to the city and the port. By the beginning of the twentieth century, however, the process of removals and marginalisation had begun.

The first to be forced out were black South Africans who were displaced from the District in 1901. As the more prosperous moved away to the suburbs, the area became a neglected ward of the city.

On 11 February 1966 it was declared a white area under the Group Areas Act of 1950, and by 1982, the life of the community was over. More than 60 000 people were forcibly removed to barren outlying areas aptly known as the Cape Flats, and their houses in District Six were flattened by bulldozers.

The District Six Museum, established in December 1994, works with the memories of the District Six experience and with that of forced removals more generally.

Location: Johannesburg- South Africa

Period of Program: October-November-December 2017

Duration of weeks: 4-8 weeks

Quota: 1 Volunteer

Webpage:  https://www.apartheidmuseum.org/

 

The Apartheid Museum opened in 2001 and is acknowledged as the pre-eminent museum in the world dealing with 20th century South Africa, at the heart of which is the apartheid story.

In 1995 the South African government set up a process for the granting of casino licenses, establishing an agency to do this called the Gambling Board. The bid documents stipulated that bidders should demonstrate how they would attract tourism and thereby grow the economy and stimulate job creation.

A consortium, called Akani Egoli (Gold Reef City), put in a bid that included the commitment to building a museum. Their bid was successful, the Gold Reef City Casino was built and an adjacent piece of land given for the construction of a museum.

The cost of the construction of what became the Apartheid Museum – approximately 80 million rand – was paid for by Gold Reef City.

The museum is registered as a Section 21 company (incorporated not for gain) with an independent board of trustees, the chairman of which is Dr John Kani. The company is separate from Gold Reef City, which has leased the museum to the Section 21 company for the duration of the casino licence. The museum therefore relies on donations, contributions and sponsorships to sustain its growth.

The Apartheid Museum, the first of its kind, illustrates the rise and fall of apartheid.

An architectural consortium, comprising several leading architectural firms, conceptualised the design of the building on a seven-hectare stand. The museum is a superb example of design, space and landscape offering the international community a unique South African experience.

The exhibits have been assembled and organised by a multi-disciplinary team of curators, film-makers, historians and designers. They include provocative film footage, photographs, text panels and artefacts illustrating the events and human stories that are part of the epic saga, known as apartheid.

A series of 22 individual exhibition areas takes the visitor through a dramatic emotional journey that tells a story of a state-sanctioned system based on racial discrimination and the struggle of the majority to overthrow this tyranny.

For anyone wanting to understand and experience what apartheid South Africa was really like, a visit to the Apartheid Museum is fundamental.

The museum is a beacon of hope showing the world how South Africa is coming to terms with its oppressive past and working towards a future that all South Africans can call their own.

DVVI Xchange Program: Memory Sites

1.1.  It is an exchange and information sharing program run through the collaborative efforts of DVV International and the Hrant Dink Foundation as part of the “Hrant Dink Memorial Site” project. It seeks to take 20 individuals – researchers, students, activists and young professionals of different disciplines and professions – working on memory and memorial sites and provide them with the opportunity to gain new experiences on this topic. It does so by sending each participant to a site of memory/conscience located in a foreign country for a period of 4-8 weeks.

 

1.2.  The program will send a total of 20 participants chosen from among applicants to foreign countries in three different phases: in the first phase, eight selected participants will be sent between August 2017-December 2017; in the second phase, ten selected participants will be sent between January 2018 – December 2018; and in the third phase, two chosen participants will be sent between January 2019 – March 2019 to the destinations of their choosing.

2.1.   Participants should:

  • Be above the age of 18,
  • Speak the national language of his/her selected host country, or speak a foreign language widely spoken in that location.
  • Have worked, be currently working on, or wish to work on the topic of ‘memorial sites/memorialization’.

 

The program strongly upholds the principle of equal opportunity and thus seeks to ensure that our participants reflect the diversity of ethnicity, gender, cultural identity and beliefs that exists in Turkey.

 

2.2. For this reason, priority will be given to applications coming from outside of Istanbul, Ankara and Izmir; young participants with no prior experiences of travel to a foreign country; and female applicants.

3.1.   The program will provide the participants with the opportunity:

  • to learn and gain practical experience at a host institution/site of memory and conscience/museum in a foreign country;
  • to experience living in a different country during this period of learning;
  • to gain theoretical and practical knowledge working within a position provided by the host institution;
  • to observe the running of a site of memory and conscience/museum and its mechanisms of expression and accepting visitors, its training programs for guides and visitors, its archiving and archive presentation methods, its techniques, and its project development processes;
  • for self-development in the areas of curating and technical equipment;
  • to turn their new experience and knowledge into practical projects suggestions and transmit these to other persons and institutions working on these issues within the country, and to bring with them suggestions for the implementation of the Hrant Dink Memorial Site;
  • to build a lasting network with their host institutions, as well as other institutions in their host countries, which could lead to further collaboration in the future.

 

3.2. Each host institution/site of memory and conscience/museum will offer a practical experience to its participant. The title, boundaries and responsibilities of these practical experiences will be clarified upon further deliberation with the host institution.

4.1. The program will cover all expenses of visas, travel insurance, domestic and international travel and accommodation, as well as provide a travel allowance to meet the basic needs of the participant while abroad.

 

4.2. The costs of transport, accommodation and food will be calculated based on the average of the host country’s government scholarships and subsequently be determined in consultation with the participant and the host institutions.

 

4.3. If the host institutions are able to provide a stipend within the scope of their own internship programs, or if they are able to provide for accommodations, they are expected to afford the participants the same opportunities.

5.1. The host institution can be any site of memory and conscience/museum, which is active in the area of memorial sites/memorialization and provides the participant with a certain experience or opportunity to learn.

 

5.2. There are no restrictions in terms of location; the host institution can be in any country.

 

5.3. The host institution can be any site of memory and conscience/museum that is active in the areas of local history, family history, political history, facing history, human rights and freedom of expression; it is sufficient that the host institution has experience and is a specialist in the areas of memory and memorialization.

 

5.4. It is desired that the host institutions provide the following opportunities:

  • Practical experience fitting to the participant’s specialty and the institution’s needs.
  • The activities and training necessary for the self-development of the participant
  • A mentor/friend who is able to provide support to the participant.

 

5.5. The open invitation to apply for the exchange program has been prepared and includes the list of host institutions, a short introduction to these institutions, and the probable positions available at these institutions; the open invitation will be published on the websites and social media pages of DVV International Turkey and the Hrant Dink Foundation, and will be shared via the related institutions.

6.1. DVV International Turkey and the Hrant Dink Foundation will synchronously conduct a call for applications. The call for applications will provide a description of the practical experience, information on when each host institution will accept participants, and what the anticipated participant profile will be.

 

6.2. Interested applicants should send their letter of motivation, justified country preferences, a minimum of one reference, and their resume to xchange@dvv-international.web.tr. The motivation letter should be no longer than 2 pages and should be written in both Turkish and a second language fitting the host country (either the national language or a foreign language widely spoken at the host country – for example, English); the reference can be given by either a person or an institution.

 

6.3. The applicants can select a maximum of 3 host countries of interest and should provide an explanation of why they chose these particular institutions.

 

6.4. The applicant may suggest other institutions which fit the program’s criteria. The suggestion will be evaluated by the joint project team established by DVV International Turkey and the Hrant Dink Foundation.

7.1. The project team will conduct a technical preliminary elimination. If there are missing documents in the application, the applicant will be contacted, as well as the person or institution listed as a reference, if necessary.

 

7.2. After the preliminary elimination, the motivation letters and resumes of the applicants will be shared with the 3 host institutions chosen by the applicant.

 

7.3. The host institutions will provide the evaluation committee with the names of the applicants that they found suitable.

 

7.4. The evaluation committee, which is composed of three members (Ayşe Öktem – DVV International Turkey Director; Associated Prof. Bülent Bilmez – Bilgi University; Sibel Asna – Board Member of Hrant Dink Foundation), aims to evaluate its participants based on the following criteria:

  • The contribution of the applicant to the program
  • Ensuring the diversity of the participants

 

7.5. Once the evaluation committee has made its decision, the accepted applicants will be put in touch with their host institution and the program will be started once the two have reached an agreement. During the meeting between the accepted applicant and the host institution, an expert from DVV International Turkey’s project team will participate in order to observe the objectives of the project, the expectations of the host institution and the motivation of the accepted applicant.

 

7.6. After the meeting with the host institutions, the finalized list of participants will be published on the websites and social media accounts of DVV International Turkey and the Hrant Foundation.

 

7.7. All applications will be responded to via e-mail.

8.1. The Xchange Program begins with the signing of an agreement between the participant, DVV International Turkey and the host institution.

 

8.2. The following are the duties and responsibilities of the participants:

  • The participants must submit a copy of the signed agreement and a photocopy of their passports to the DVV International Turkey office; furthermore, they must attend an orientation workshop organized by DVV International Turkey before their travel.
  • The participants are tasked with sharing their experiences, observations, daily activities and fascinating ideas gathered during the exchange program via a blog. The blog will be bilingual – both Turkish and English.
  • Upon completion of the program, it is expected that the participants will share their experiences and observations during panels, presentations and workshops which will be organized; and that they provide mentorship to the participants who will participate in the program in the following phase.
  • It is expected that the participants will provide suitable contributions to the exhibition method and visitor programs of the Hrant Dink Memorial Site as a result of their gathered experience.

 

8.3. DVV International Turkey will organize the travel/health insurance and the logistics of transportation, as well as maintain the communication with the host institution. Furthermore, DVV International Turkey will assume the role of facilitating the visa processes, provide suggestions for accommodations, and provide the necessary support for the participants during their stay abroad.

 

8.4. It is expected that the host institutions will provide the participants with the opportunity for learning, experience and growth; supportive educational programs; and a recommendation for a mentor.

 

8.5. If any unexpected situation arises, the participant and/or the host institution should directly contact DVV International Turkey.

 

  1.     The timeline will be determined at a later date.

 

For any questions or further information, please contact us at: xchange@dvvinternational.web.tr

Download Program Principles